What is radon?

Radon is a chemical element with the symbol Rn and atomic number 86. It is a radioactive, colorless, odorless, and tasteless noble gas that occurs naturally in small amounts in the earth's atmosphere. Radon is a byproduct of the radioactive decay of uranium and thorium, which are found in small amounts in the soil and rocks. When these elements break down, they release radon gas, which can escape into the air and enter homes and buildings through cracks in the foundation, flooring, and walls.

Radon is a concern because it can accumulate to high levels in homes and buildings, where it can pose a health hazard. When inhaled, radon can damage the cells lining the lung, increasing the risk of lung cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, and it is the second leading cause of lung cancer overall. The risk of developing lung cancer from radon exposure is higher for people who smoke or have smoked in the past.

There are simple and inexpensive ways to test for the presence of radon in homes and buildings, and there are effective ways to reduce radon levels if they are found to be elevated. If you are concerned about the level of radon in your home or building, you should consider having it tested.

Is radon harmful?

Yes, radon can be harmful to human health if it is present at high levels in the air that people breathe. Radon is a radioactive gas that is produced by the natural breakdown of uranium and thorium in the soil and rocks. When these elements break down, they release radon gas, which can escape into the air and enter homes and buildings through cracks in the foundation, flooring, and walls.

Radon is a concern because it can accumulate to high levels in homes and buildings, where it can pose a health hazard. When inhaled, radon can damage the cells lining the lung, increasing the risk of lung cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, and it is the second leading cause of lung cancer overall. The risk of developing lung cancer from radon exposure is higher for people who smoke or have smoked in the past.

There are simple and inexpensive ways to test for the presence of radon in homes and buildings, and there are effective ways to reduce radon levels if they are found to be elevated. If you are concerned about the level of radon in your home or building, you should consider having it tested.

Indoor radon - a public health perspective.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that can accumulate to high levels inside homes and buildings. When inhaled, radon can damage the cells lining the lung, increasing the risk of lung cancer. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) estimates that radon is the leading cause of lung cancer among non-smokers, and it is the second leading cause of lung cancer overall. The risk of developing lung cancer from radon exposure is higher for people who smoke or have smoked in the past.

The health risks associated with radon exposure can be reduced by testing homes and buildings for radon and taking steps to reduce elevated levels. Simple and inexpensive radon test kits are widely available and can be used to determine the radon levels in a home or building. If high levels of radon are found, there are effective ways to reduce the radon levels and protect against the health risks associated with radon exposure.

Overall, addressing indoor radon is important for public health. It is important for individuals to be aware of the risks associated with radon exposure and to take steps to protect themselves and their families by testing for radon and taking action to reduce elevated levels.

Environmental radiation